WELCOME TO 
DR. J'S LOUNGE

Reflections and conversations for the bold, resilient, and courageous.

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DR. J'S LOUNGE

is a safe space for people of all backgrounds to come together to have reflective introspection, and dialogue about race, immigration, religion, health, wellness, and more! I invite you to pour yourself a warm drink, sit comfortably, and let's engage in bold, courageous reflections and conversations.

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ABOUT DR. J

Ekabo! Bienvenidos! Welcome!

My name is Dr. Janet Awokoya, an entrepreneur, scholar-activist, and published author whose work focuses on the struggles, accomplishments, cultures, and histories of the Black, African Diaspora. I have always had a curiosity for different cultures, this led me to travel around the world, and to live on four continents. I think, study and write about the experiences of African, Caribbean, and Latin American immigrants and refugees.

Throughout the years, I have made it my personal mission to explore societies’ outcomes of African people’s dispersion to different regions of the world. My research examines the implications of the increasing diversity of the Black populations within these nations, focusing on the children of immigrants, also called the 1.5 and second-generation. I pay particular attention to how identities are created, nurtured, and contested in these diasporic spaces for the host and migrant home societies and individuals. 

 

I invite you to subscribe to the site to stay connected, learn more about my research on the 1.5 and second generation, and read the blogs on health and wellness. Kindly share the content with family, friends, and colleagues. Afterward, join us for our Zukossa Heat fitness classes to strengthen and tone your body. Remain encouraged, friends! Peace and blessings!

Sincerely,

Dr. J

Blog Posts

Articles on African Immigrant Youth

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IDENTITY CONSTRUCTIONS AND NEGOTIATIONS AMONG 1.5- AND SECOND-GENERATION NIGERIANS

Past scholarship on immigrant racial and ethnic identity construction tends to ignore the processes by which social context influences identity at the individual level.

Done to Us, Not with Us: African American Parent Perceptions of K-12 Education

 The report explores how low-income African American parents view the K-12 education system and their roles in supporting their children, and highlights the challenges with engagement at their child’s school.

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Articles on the First Generation, Low Income, and Underrepresented Students and Families

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